Chemical analysis of thermal waters in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, 1960-65
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Chemical analysis of thermal waters in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, 1960-65 by Jack James Rowe

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Published by U.S. Govt. Print. Off. in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Yellowstone National Park.

Subjects:

  • Geysers -- Yellowstone National Park.,
  • Springs -- Yellowstone National Park.,
  • Water -- Analysis.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 9-10.

Statementby J. J. Rowe, R. O. Fournier, and G. W. Morey.
SeriesGeological Survey bulletin 1303
ContributionsFournier, Robert O. 1932-, Morey, G. W. 1888-1965.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQE75 .B9 no. 1303
The Physical Object
Paginationiii, 31 p.
Number of Pages31
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5522191M
LC Control Number73600154

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Get this from a library! Chemical analysis of thermal waters in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, results for samples collected from 89 geysers, pools, and hot springs are compiled together with previous analyses. [Jack James Rowe; Robert O Fournier; G W Morey; Geological Survey (U.S.)] -- Analytical results for samples collected during from . Summary: Analytical results for samples collected during from 89 geysers, pools, and hot springs are compiled together with previous analyses to provide a comprehensive collection of available analytical data on the thermal waters of Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. @article{osti_, title = {Chemical analyses of waters from geysers, hot springs, and pools in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming from to }, author = {Thompson, J.M. and Yadav, S.}, abstractNote = {Waters from geysers, hot springs, and pools of Yellowstone National Park have been analyzed. We report complete major ion analyses from .   Chemical analysis of thermal waters in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, – Geological Survey Bulletin , Department of the Interior. Google Scholar Seckbach. J. Kocielek. JP. eds () The Diatom World Cited by:

In Yellowstone National Park most thermal waters issue from hot, shallow aquifers with pressures in excess of hydrostatic by 2 to 6 bars and with large flows (the flow of hot spring water from the Park is greater than liters per second). These conditions should be ideal for the use of chemical indicators to estimate aquifer by: Chloride flux and surface water discharge out of Yellowstone National Park, , by D.R. Norton and Irving Friedman. 42 p. B Whistle, a nearly dormant geyser in Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming: The first geyser to be studied by research drilling, by D.E. White. 13 p. B Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 12 () Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, Amsterdam -- Printed in The Netherlands EVOLUTION OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS DEDUCED FROM CHEMISTRY PLOTS: YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK (U.S.A.) EMANUEL MAZOR and J.M. THOMPSON Geo-Isotope Group, Isotope Department, Cited by: 9.