European discovery of the world and its economic effects on pre-industrial society, 1500-1800
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European discovery of the world and its economic effects on pre-industrial society, 1500-1800 papers of the Tenth International Economic History Congress by International Economic History Congress (10th 1990 Louvain, Belgium)

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Published by F. Steiner in Stuttgart .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • America

Subjects:

  • Economic history -- Congresses.,
  • America -- Discovery and exploration -- Congresses.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

Statementedited on behalf of the International Economic History Association by Hans Pohl.
SeriesVierteljahrschrift für Sozial- und Wirtschaftsgeschichte. Beiheft,, Nr. 89, Vierteljahrschrift für Sozial- und Wirtschaftsgeschichte., Nr. 89.
ContributionsPohl, Hans., International Economic History Association.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHC13 .I548 1990
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 330 p. :
Number of Pages330
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1344916M
ISBN 103515055460
LC Control Number92231718

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The European discovery of the world and its economic effects on pre-industrial society, / Ed. by Hans Pohl. ISBN: Author: Pohl, Hans viaf Conference: International economic history congress 10th August Leuven Publisher: Stuttgart: Steiner, Cited by: Hans Pohl (éd.), The European Discovery of the World and its Economic Effects on Pre-Industrial Society, By Paul Butel Publisher: PERSÉE: Université de Lyon, CNRS & ENS de LyonAuthor: Paul Butel.   European exploration from the 15th to the 20th centuries has had a profound and permanent effect on world history. As the European nations enriched their societies with new goods and crops, precious metals and more, they decimated indigenous populations. History of Europe - History of Europe - The emergence of modern Europe, – The 16th century was a period of vigorous economic expansion. This expansion in turn played a major role in the many other transformations—social, political, and cultural—of the early modern age. By the population in most areas of Europe was increasing after two centuries of decline or stagnation.

The Industrial Revolution and Its Impact on European Society One reported: “We have repeatedly seen married females, in the last stage of pregnancy, slaving from morning to night beside these never-tiring machines, and when they were obliged to sit down to take a moment’s ease, and being seen by the manager, were fined for the. ‘European Industrialization: From the Voyages of Discovery to the Industrial Revolution’, in H. Pohl (ed.), The European Discovery of the World and its Economic Effects on Pre-Industrial Society –, – Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag. Although Europe represents only about 8 percent of the planet's landmass, from to , Europeans conquered or colonized more than 80 percent of the entire world. Being dominated for centuries has led to lingering inequality and long-lasting effects in many formerly colonized countries, including poverty and slow economic growth. Mercantilism was an economic theory that held that a niche and prosperity depended on it supply of gold and silver and that the total volume of trade is unchangeable, it's adherence advocated that the government's play an active role in the economy by encouraging the .

The European Discovery of the World and its Economic Effects on Pre-Industrial Society, (Papers of the Tenth International Economic History Congress), Stuttgart, Franz Steiner Verlag, ; x + pp.; DM 80,-. History of Europe - History of Europe - Aspects of early modern society: To examine the psychology of merchants is to stay within a narrow social elite. Historians, in what is sometimes called “the new social history,” have paid close attention to the common people of Europe and to hitherto neglected social groups—women, the nonconformists, and minorities. Expansion of long-distance trade was a key component of Europe’s commercial revolution, but changes within the trading world of the northern seas — the North Sea and the Baltic — have been substantially underestimated in explanations of the rise of the world economy from c– Book Title. The European Discovery of the World and its Economic Effects on Pre-Industrial Society, Papers of the Tenth International Economic History Congress. Edited on Behalf of the International Economic History Association. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag Stuttgart,